Why Education for Peace is Important

Most disputes between people are solved without violence – but not all. If we are to move away from violence as a way of solving disputes at home and abroad we must work together to help young people learn how deal with conflict creatively and nonviolently.

To prevent continued cycles of violence, education must promote peace, tolerance and understanding to help create a better society for all.

Disputes and conflicts may be inevitable but violence is not. To prevent continued cycles of violence, education must seek to promote peace and tolerance, not fuel hatred and suspicion.

The General Assembly of the United Nations proclaimed the years 2001-2010 the International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Nonviolence for the Children of the World”.

It defines a culture of peace as ‘all the values, attitudes and forms of behaviour that reflect respect for life, for human dignity and for all human rights, the rejection of violence in all its forms and commitment to the principles of freedom, justice, solidarity, tolerance and understanding between people’.

Essential for building a culture of peace is education for peace. The United Nations has called on every country to ‘ensure that children, from an early age, benefit from education to enable them to resolve any dispute peacefully and in a spirit of respect for human dignity and of tolerance’.

Most disputes between people are solved without violence – but not all. If we are to move away from violence as a means to solve disputes at home and abroad we must work together to help young people learn how deal with conflict creatively and nonviolently.